Tune up a snowblower

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diy-snowblower-20201102

A tune up involves inspecting its parts and replenishing fluids and the owner’ s manual is a good guide to follow.

If you have a snowblower, you know how you depend on it when the forecast calls for a heavy snowfall, especially if you live on a corner lot or have a long driveway. The machine makes the job of removing that snow and buildup of drifts a job you can handle. If you have a snowblower or plan to buy one, budget the time and money to tune up the machine so it’s always on call and ready to use.

A tune up involves inspecting its parts and replenishing fluids and the owner’s manual is a good guide to follow. A tune up begins with seeing that the fuel is fresh because stale fuel is often why it won’t start. Use a fuel stabilizer and replace the fuel filter. Inspect the scraper blade and slide or skid shoes that protect the housing from damage. If necessary, replace them.

Replace the spark plug and inspect the auger paddles and replace them if the rubber has worn down. Lubricate the bearings and check the tires for air pressure. Make sure there are no object in front of the snowblower that can be sucked into the front. Start the engine and run it for 5 minutes or so to heat up the engine oil so it easily flows out of the crankcase.

A repair service will cost $95, including labor and material, to tune up a snowblower. There may be an extra charge for pickup and delivery. A handy homeowner can do the job for $25, the cost of a tune up kit.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$95 — $25 — 2.0 — 2.3 — $70 — 74%

©2020 Gene and Katie Hamilton. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.